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Charity Work Visa 2024

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Charity Work Visa 2024

Charity Work Visa 2024, To lawfully work as an overseas national, various temporary immigration routes are available in the UK. Those who wish to work within the charitable sector for a short period of time will likely require a UK charity worker visa.

From what it is and what it allows to whether charity workers can settle in the UK, this essential guide examines all aspects of the visa.

What Is the Charity Work Visa?

It is a visa that overseas voluntary workers aged 18 or over need to come to the UK to work for a recognized charitable organisation on a temporary and unpaid basis. As a sponsored work route, the UK charity must be approved by the Home Office to sponsor these workers.

Known as the volunteer visa UK, this visa replaced the Temporary Worker – Charity Worker visa (T5) under the old rules.

Who Is Eligible for the Charity Work Visa UK?

Applicants aged 18 or older who wish to do voluntary work for a licensed UK sponsor for no more than 12 months are eligible for the charity worker visa. As a condition of applying for a licence to sponsor charity workers, an organization must either be a registered, excepted or exempt UK charity in accordance with the relevant legislation in force in that part of the UK, or an ecclesiastical corporation with charitable purposes.

The standard visitor can also volunteer during his or her stay in the UK, but only if it is for a charity registered with the Charity Commission of England and Wales, the Northern Ireland Charity Regulator, or the Scottish Charity Regulator, and if it lasts not longer than 30 days. Visitors to the UK cannot change to charity worker status while they are there. If they want to work in an unpaid voluntary capacity for more than 30 days, they will need to leave the UK and apply for entry clearance from overseas on the charity worker route.

Charity Work Visa Requirements

People wanting to come to the UK on the charity worker route must comply with the requirements set forth under Appendix Temporary Work – Charity Worker of the UK’s Immigration Rules.

  • Application must be made by an applicant who is 18 years or older
  • Valid CoS issued by a UK sponsor, pertaining to the work of the sponsoring organization, in order to do eligible charity work
  • In accordance with the rules, meet the financial requirements
  • Having a genuine desire and the capability to carry out the voluntary work they are being sponsored to do in the UK
  • Other than the charity work for which they are being sponsored and any additional voluntary work that meets the relevant criteria, they do not intend to undertake employment.
  • Not subject to general refusal grounds.
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Also, the applicant must not be subject to the cooling-off period. In the 12 months prior to an application for entry clearance, the applicant must not have been in the UK with permission as a charity worker or religious worker. As a result, a charity worker who has already been granted a 12-month leave to work in the UK can’t leave the UK and apply for the same route again immediately.

If the cooling-off period applies, the applicant will not be eligible for a further grant of entry clearance until 12 months have passed since either the date their last permission on the charity worker or religious worker route expired, or the date they last left the UK, if this was earlier than the date their permission on the charity worker or religious worker route expired.

It is necessary for charity work to meet three criteria in order to qualify as eligible. A volunteer fieldwork assignment must be directly related to the sponsor’s charitable objectives, and it cannot include routine administrative tasks or fundraising roles. In addition, the worker must not be filling a position, even temporarily, that is required on a permanent basis, and the work must be unpaid, except for reasonable expenses.

In the context of any additional work, this is permissible under this route for up to 20 hours per week, provided any second job is in the same sector and at the same level as the main job. A charity worker visa-holder cannot, however, receive payments for his or her work, take up a permanent position, or receive benefits or a state pension.

How to Apply for a Charity Worker Visa

Applicants outside the UK must apply for charity worker visas online. It is not possible to switch immigration categories to the charity worker route, which does not allow switching between any subcategories of temporary workers. In other words, a prospective charity worker must leave the UK and apply for entry clearance on this route from overseas if they are already in the UK on another route.

See also  H-2B Visa Requirements

An applicant must pay a fee along with the immigration health surcharge (IHS) when applying for a charity worker visa in order to have access to the NHS. In addition to their passport or other valid travel document, they must also provide any supporting documentation to prove their identity and nationality. Some additional documents may be required, depending on their circumstances, such as evidence of sufficient savings and tuberculosis test results, if they are from a country where the test is required.

In order to prove their identity, an applicant needs to know where they are from and what type of passport they hold. To obtain a biometric residence permit, they may need to have their fingerprints and photos taken at a visa application center overseas. Alternatively, they may be able to use the UK Immigration

How much does it cost to apply for a charity worker visa UK?

An application for a charity worker visa UK costs £259, which includes both the principal applicant and any dependents.

Each applicant will also be required to pay the IHS. For applicants over 18, the surcharge will amount to £624 for a 12-month stay, but for those under 18, it will be £470. The applicant and any dependents must also prove that they have enough personal savings to support themselves upon entering the UK in addition to the above costs. The UK sponsor may, however, certify maintenance for the whole family on the sponsorship certificate.

How long does it take to get a charity worker visa?

You can apply for a charity worker visa UK up to three months before your start date of work in the UK. A CoS will list this date. An applicant will have to provide their documents and prove their identity as part of their application, which may require extra time if an appointment is required. When they start the visa application, they will find out if they need to attend an appointment.

See also  Visa Bulletin For January 2024

Charity worker visa UK applications typically take 3 weeks to process, although a quicker decision may be available for a fee. Once granted a visa, a successful applicant can enter the UK up to 14 days before the start date of their job.

Can a Charity Worker Visa UK Be Extended?

The charity worker visa route is a temporary work route, with a maximum stay of 12 months in the UK. Thus, a charity worker visa holder cannot extend their visa beyond one year. If, however, the leave was granted for less than 12 months, the applicant may be able to extend their stay, but the application must be made before the expiration date of their current visa. Additionally, they must be in the UK when applying to extend and continue to meet the relevant requirements.

When applying to extend permission under the charity worker route, the applicant will be told whether they can use the ID app or whether they will need to schedule an appointment at a UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services (UKVCAS) service point. Once the applicant has proved their identity or attended any appointment, they will usually receive a decision within 8 weeks, although the fee for a faster decision will be £259.

In addition, permission for partners and dependent children living in the UK will not automatically be extended in accordance with the charity worker’s, who will also have to apply to extend it. The grant of leave will remain valid until the expiration date of their existing visa if they choose not to extend their permission to stay this way.

Conclusion

The Charity Worker Visa in the UK facilitates short-term voluntary work for individuals aged 18 or older. This guide covers key aspects, including eligibility, requirements, and the application process. The visa is sponsored by recognized charitable organizations approved by the Home Office. Eligibility criteria involve age, sponsorship, financial requirements, and genuine intent for voluntary work. The processing time is typically three weeks, and the visa is valid for up to 12 months. Extensions may be possible, subject to conditions. The application fee for a charity worker visa is £259, with additional costs for the Immigration Health Surcharge.

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USA Visa

US Department of State Releases Visa Bulletin October 2023

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US Department of State Releases Visa Bulletin October 2023

US Department of State Releases Visa Bulletin October 2023. US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will use the Dates for Filing Chart in October 2023. A number of visa categories will advance in October 2023 in the State Department Visa Bulletin.

According to the October 2023 Visa Bulletin released by the US Department of State, priority date cutoffs are in place to regulate immigrant visa availability as well as the flow of adjustment of status applications and consular immigrant visa applications.

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Statutory Numbers for Preference Immigrant Visas

In this bulletin, we summarize the availability of immigrant numbers during October for: “Final Action Dates,” “Dates for Filing Applications,” and when applicants for immigrant visas should assemble and submit required documentation to the National Visa Center.

For determining when individuals can submit applications for adjustment of status, individuals should use the “Final Action Dates” charts below, unless otherwise indicated on the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website at www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo. In the event that the USCIS determines that there are more immigrant visas available for the fiscal year than there are known applicants for such visas, the agency will state on its website that applicants may instead use the “Dates for Filing Visa Applications” charts in this bulletin.

1. Procedures for determining dates: Applicants for numerically limited visas must be reported to the Department of State by consular officers; applicants for status adjustment must be reported to USCIS by USCIS. For demand received by September 8th, allocations are presented in the charts below in chronological order of reported priority dates. Those categories or foreign states where demand was excessive were considered oversubscribed if it wasn’t possible to satisfy all demand. The final action date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who could not be reached within the numerical limits. Supplemental requests for numbers will be honored only if the priority date falls within the new final action date announced in this bulletin if it becomes necessary during the monthly allocation process to retrogress a final action date. Whenever the annual limit is reached, the preference category must be made “unavailable”, and no further requests will be honored.

2. The fiscal year 2024 limit for family: According to Section 201 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), there are 226,000 sponsored preference immigrants. There are at least 140,000 employment-based preference immigrants worldwide each year. Under Section 202, preference immigrants are limited to 7% of the annual family-sponsored and employment-based preference limits, i.e., 25,620.  The dependent area limit is set at 2%, or 7,320.

3. INA Section 203(e) provides that family: Applicants who have applied for sponsored and employment-based preference visas are given visas in the order they were petitioned for. If accompanying or following their principal, spouses and children of preference immigrants are entitled to the same status, as well as the same order of consideration. When visa issuances will exceed the per-country limit for a foreign state or dependent area, Section 202(e) provides visa prorating provisions. At present, these provisions apply to the following oversubscribed chargeability areas:  CHINA-mainland born, INDIA, MEXICO, and PHILIPPINES.

4. Family-sponsored: immigrant visas are allotted according to the following preference classes under section 203(a) of the INA:

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Family-Sponsored Preferences

First: (F1) Children of U.S. citizens who are unmarried:  23,400 plus any numbers not required for fourth preference.

Second: Unmarried sons and daughters of Permanent Residents:  114,200, plus the number (if any) by which the worldwide family preference level exceeds 226,000, plus any unused first preference numbers:

A. (F2A) 77% of the overall second preference limitation is for spouses and children of permanent residents; 75% of the per-country limit is exempt for spouses and children of permanent residents;

B. (F2B) The second preference limitation for unmarried sons and daughters (21 years of age or older) of permanent residents is 23%.

Third: (F3) The number of married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens is 23,400, plus any numbers not required by the first preference and second preference.

Fourth: (F4) 65,000, plus any numbers not required by the first three preferences.

See also  Visa Bulletin For December 2023

Final Action Dates for Family-Sponsored Preference Cases

If a class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1), the listing of a date indicates that the class is oversubscribed. Numbers “C” are authorized to be issued to all qualified applicants, while numbers “U” are not authorized to be issued. (NOTE: Only applicants whose priority dates are earlier than the final action dates listed below are authorized to issue numbers.)

Family-
Sponsored 
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES 
F1 01JAN15 01JAN15 01JAN15 22APR01 01MAR12
F2A 08FEB19 08FEB19 08FEB19 01FEB19 08FEB19
F2B 22SEP15 22SEP15 22SEP15 01JAN02 22OCT11
F3 08JAN09 08JAN09 08JAN09 08MAR98 08JUN02
F4 22APR07 22APR07 08OCT05 01AUG00 22AUG02

F2A numbers with priority dates earlier than 01FEB19 are exempt from per-country limits for October. Applicants chargeable to all countries except Mexico, with priority dates beginning 01FEB19 and before 08FEB19, are authorized to apply for F2A numbers subject to per-country limits. MEXICO F2A numbers are exempt from the per-country limit.

See also  US Department of State Releases Visa Bulletin October 2023

Dates for Filing Family-Sponsored Visa Applications

Listed below are dates for applying for visas within a timeframe that warrants immediate action. Following receipt of notification containing detailed instructions from the National Visa Center, applicants for immigrant visas with a priority date earlier than the application date in the chart below may assemble and submit the required documents to the Department of State’s National Visa Center. Oversubscribed categories have the priority date of the first applicant who cannot submit documents for an immigrant visa to the National Visa Center. Applicants in a category designated “current” may apply regardless of their priority date if the category is designated “current.”

Applications may be filed regardless of the applicant’s priority date if the “C” listing indicates that the category is currently active. When a category is listed with a specific date, only applicants whose priority date is earlier than the listed date can apply.

USCIS has determined that this chart can be used (in place of the chart in paragraph 4.A.) this month for filing applications for adjustment of status at www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo. 

Family-
Sponsored 
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES 
F1 01SEP17 01SEP17 01SEP17 01APR05 22APR15
F2A 01SEP23 01SEP23 01SEP23 01SEP23 01SEP23
F2B 01JAN17 01JAN17 01JAN17 01AUG04 01OCT13
F3 01MAR10 01MAR10 01MAR10 15JUN01 08NOV03
F4 01MAR08 01MAR08 22FEB06 15APR01 22APR04

5.  Section 203(b) of the INA prescribes preference classes for allotment of Employment-based immigrant visas as follows:

Employment-Based Preferences

First: Including any numbers not required for fourth and fifth preferences, 28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level.

Second: People with advanced degrees or exceptional abilities:  28.6% of the worldwide employment-based preference level, plus any numbers not required by first preference.

Third: Professionals, Skilled Workers, and Other Workers: 28.6% of the worldwide level, plus any numbers not required by first and second preferences, not exceeding 10,000.

Fourth: Special Immigrants: 7.1% of the worldwide population.

Fifth: There are 7.1% of jobs created worldwide, of which 32% are reserved for qualified immigrants who invest in rural areas; 10% for qualified immigrants who invest in areas with high unemployment; and 2% for qualified immigrants who invest in infrastructure projects. In the remaining 68%, all qualified immigrants are allotted a place.

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Final Action Dates for Employment-Based Preference Cases

There is an indication on the chart below that a class is oversubscribed (see paragraph 1) if a date appears; “C” means current, i.e., numbers are issuance to all qualified applicants; and “U” means unauthorized, i.e., numbers are not issuance authorized. NOTE: Numbers may only be issued to applicants whose priority date is earlier than the final action date listed below.)

Employment-
based
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO PHILIPPINES
1st C 15FEB22 01JAN17 C C
2nd 08JUL22 01OCT19 01JAN12 08JUL22 08JUL22
3rd 01DEC21 01JAN20 01MAY12 01DEC21 01DEC21
Other Workers 01AUG20 01JAN16 01MAY12 01AUG20 01MAY20
4th 01JAN19 01JAN19 01JAN19 01JAN19 01JAN19
Certain Religious Workers U U U U U
5th Unreserved
(including C5, T5, I5, R5)
C 01OCT15 15DEC18 C C
5th Set Aside:
Rural (20%)
C C C C C
5th Set Aside:
High Unemployment (10%)
C C C C C
5th Set Aside:
Infrastructure (2%)
C C C C C

Employment Third Preference Other Workers Category: Congress passed the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act (NACARA) in November 1997. Section 1(e) of Pub. L. 105-139 stipulates that once the Employment Third Preference Other Worker (EW) cut-off date has reached the priority date of the most recent EW petition approved prior to November 19, 1997, the 10,000 EW numbers available for a fiscal year will be reduced by 5,000 in the following year. This reduction is to be made for as long as necessary to offset adjustments under the NACARA program. As of Fiscal Year 2002, the annual limit for EWs has been reduced to 5,000 since the final action date reached November 19, 1997. In Fiscal Year 2024, this reduction will be limited to 150.

Dates for Filing of Employment-Based Visa Applications

In the chart below, you can see the dates for submitting visa applications within a timeframe that warrants immediate action. As soon as the Department of State notifies applicants with a priority date earlier than the application date in the chart, they can gather and submit the required documents to the National Visa Center, following instructions provided by the National Visa Center. The application date for an oversubscribed category is the priority date of the first applicant who cannot submit documentation to the National Visa Center for an immigrant visa. Applicants in a category designated “current” may file regardless of their priority dates.

Applications may be filed regardless of the applicant’s priority date if the “C” listing indicates that the category is currently active. When a category is listed with a specific date, only applicants whose priority date is earlier than the listed date can apply.

You can find out if USCIS has determined that this chart can be used (in lieu of the chart in paragraph 5.A.) this month for filing applications for adjustment of status at www.uscis.gov/visabulletininfo. 

Employment-
based
All Chargeability
Areas Except
Those Listed
CHINA-
mainland
born
INDIA MEXICO  PHILIPPINES 
1st C 01AUG22 01JUL19 C C
2nd 01JAN23 01JAN20 15MAY12 01JAN23 01JAN23
3rd 01FEB23 01SEP20 01AUG12 01FEB23 01JAN23
Other Workers 15DEC20 01JUN17 01AUG12 15DEC20 15MAY20
4th 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19
Certain Religious Workers 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19 01MAR19
5th Unreserved
(including C5, T5, I5, R5)
C 01JAN17 01APR22 C C
5th Set Aside:
(Rural – 20%)
C C C C C
5th Set Aside:
(High Unemployment – 10%)
C C C C C
5th Set Aside:
(Infrastructure – 2%)
C C C C C

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Diversity Immigrant (DV) Category for the Month of October

In accordance with section 203(c) of the INA, persons from countries with low admissions for the past five years may apply for up to 55,000 immigrant visas each fiscal year. As a result of NACARA, up to 5,000 of the 55,000 diversity visas allocated annually will be available for use as part of the program beginning with DV-99. As a result, the DV-2024 annual limit will be reduced to approximately 54,850.  A country cannot receive more than seven percent of the diversity visas in any given year. Diversity visas are divided among six geographical regions.

In October, immigrant numbers in the DV category are available for qualified DV-2024 applicants, which are charged to all regions/eligible countries. Only applicants with DV regional lottery rank numbers BELOW the allocation cut-off number will be granted visas when an allocation cut-off number is shown:

Region All DV Chargeability Areas Except
Those Listed Separately
AFRICA 10,000 Except:  Algeria     7,500
Egypt        5,500
Morocco   5,600
ASIA 2,000 Except:  Iran     1,750
Nepal  1,300
EUROPE 4,500 Except:  Russia         4,400
Uzbekistan  1,250
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS) 2
OCEANIA 225
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
375
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An applicant’ immigrant status in the DV category lasts only until the end of the fiscal (visa) year for which they are selected. In the DV-2024 program, the year of entitlement ends on September 30, 2024. After that date, DV visas cannot be issued to DV-2024 applicants. Similarly, spouses and children accompanying or following DV-2024 principals will receive derivative DV status until September 30, 2024. It is not guaranteed that DV visas will be available throughout FY-2024. Numbers could run out before September 30.

Diversity (DV) Immigrant Category Rank Cut-Offs for November

In November, DV-2024 applicants are eligible to apply for immigrant numbers, which are chargeable to all regions/eligible countries as follows. There are visas available only to applicants whose DV regional lottery rank numbers are BELOW the allocation cut-off number when an allocation cut-off number is shown:

Region All DV Chargeability Areas Except
Those Listed Separately
AFRICA 10,000 Except: Algeria     7,500
Egypt       5,500
Morocco  5,600
ASIA 2,300 Except:  Iran       2,200
Nepal    1,300
EUROPE 5,000 Except:  Russia         4,750
Uzbekistan   1,250
NORTH AMERICA (BAHAMAS)  2
OCEANIA 300
SOUTH AMERICA,
and the CARIBBEAN
500

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Scheduled Expiration of the Employment Fourth Preference (SR) Religious Workers Category

On December 29, 2022, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2023, extended the Employment Fourth Preference Certain Religious Workers (SR) category until September 30, 2023. After midnight September 29, 2023, SR visas cannot be issued overseas, or adjustment of status cases may not be finalized.  The validity of visas issued before that date will end on September 29, 2023, and all individuals seeking admission in the non-minister special immigrant category must be admitted (repeat admitted) by that date.

The SR category is listed as “Unavailable” for all countries for October. If legislation is passed to extend the category, it is likely to become available immediately if it is extended. Based on the applicable foreign state of chargeability, the category will be subject to the same final action dates as the other Employment Fourth Preference categories.

Employment-Based Visa Availability for Fy-2024

As a result of new visa numbers available for FY-2024, final action dates have been advanced across most employment-based visa categories. A potential date advancement throughout the fiscal year is intended to keep visa issuance within quarterly limits in accordance with INA sections 201(a)(2) and 203(g). During FY-2024, visa demand and issuance patterns will determine the actual date movements.

See also  Visa Bulletin For December 2023

Conclusion 

In October 2023, the US Department of State released the Visa Bulletin, signaling advancements in various visa categories. The bulletin establishes priority date cutoffs to manage immigrant visa availability and regulate adjustment of status applications. Applicants should refer to “Final Action Dates” for status adjustment and may use “Dates for Filing Applications” if USCIS indicates availability. The bulletin outlines specific criteria, procedures, and limits for family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas, emphasizing real-time monitoring and data-driven decision-making for effective immigration management. The Diversity Immigrant Category and upcoming adjustments in Employment Fourth Preference (SR) Religious Workers Category are also detailed. Overall, the bulletin reflects efforts to streamline immigration processes and adapt to evolving demand and policies.

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